National Debt, Impending Disaster, and the Christian Response

Our nation has gone massively into debt.  We hear about the national deficit quite a bit, but I wonder if perhaps we don’t fully understand the full implications of our predicament.

Up to this point in history, America has never faced a problem quite like this.  According to one documentary, we are probably almost beyond the point of no return.  Not only is our debt increasing, but the rate at which it is increasing is rising exponentially.  If there isn’t a change, our government will be completely broke in only a few decades, and the USA will probably have to be “sold” to another nation.  If there is a change, it will have to be so drastic that it will result in catastrophic consequences for our nation as well … that’s according to one documentary…

I’m no expert on this subject.  I try to keep a balanced view of politics and I don’t publicly promote one side versus another. This is not the fault of any one president, but no president since WWII has successfully addressed the issue.  I think that Americans in general feel insulated, as though these things can’t happen to us.  But as a Christian, how should we respond to issues such as this?  Talk radio hosts tell us that right now, we need to be working extra hard – 12 hour days – stockpiling as much as we can.  It is nothing new that a mighty nation should come crashing down.  History has shown it, the Bible has shown it.  But are we to live a life based on fear?

Hard times give us the opportunity to put our faith into action.  We can talk a lot about faith in church, but it doesn’t mean nearly as much coming from the perspective of a life lived in comfort, where no opportunity to challenge our faith arises.

Jesus tells us what to pray:  Your Kingdom come, Your will be done, ON EARTH AS IT IS IN HEAVEN (emphasis mine). The Jewish and early Christian people were not only longing for a way of life that would result in going to heaven when they die.  They were longing for heaven and earth to collide.  They prayed for the day of the Lord, a terrible day of judgment and sifting through the grain, or separating the sheep from the goats if you will.  But beyond that day would be the dawn of a new age – the Age to Come – no more would we live in the present evil age.  It would be an age when all evil is undone, nations would be brought down and the Messiah would rule as the true Lord of the world on God’s behalf, with all his people resurrected as He is resurrected and brought into His presence to live.  Creation would finally be as it was meant to be.  Jesus’ resurrection is the beginning, or first fruits, of that age.  When he returns, we will see these things come to pass in full.

Living a life in faith does not mean sacrificing wisdom.  We should be thinking strategically about the future today.  But as Christians, we should be on our knees right now.  If Christ’s return means all that the Bible says it means, then in the face of calamity, we should be praying for His return, just as we see John pray in the close of his book of Revelation.  We should also be praying that in the meantime, His kingdom would continue to infiltrate this world, and that as Christians, our lives would be shining examples – previews if you will – of that coming age.  A nation living in prosperity can easily be critical of Christians, but a nation crying out in the darkness for any sign of hope might view the strength and faith of true believers a bit differently.  God is much bigger than our problems.  Perhaps our greatest challenge is to trust Him, and trust Him fully.

But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added unto you. – Matthew 6:33.

He who testifies to these things says “Surely I am coming soon.”  Amen.  Come, Lord Jesus! – Revelation 21:20

<photo courtesy of Kailyn Henry via Flickr.com>

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